Stock Image Agency Apologizes for 'Hottest World Cup Fans' Album

“Nobody is actually offended by this, but we live in a state of perpetual offense and outrage. Getty Images needs to do a Diego Maradona and drop the double bird on these people.”

-- Clay Travis

Clay Travis took offense to Getty Images taking down a World Cup photo album this week that showcased some of the most aesthetically pleasing fans spotted at stadiums in Russia cheering on countries from all over the world.

There was instant blowback on Twitter, as some users complained that the article was sexist and misogynist, with a few even referencing the #MeToo movement against sexual harassment. Getty would then wipe the piece from its website and issue an apology, saying it did not meet their editorial standards.

Travis says it’s another classic case of bored PC nutjobs sitting in front of their computers trying to find even the most innocuous topics to leech onto and slowly suffocate with nonsensical fake outrage, knowing a major company would cave to a highly exaggerated sense of bad publicity.

Travis said it’s ironic that Getty had to take down this album when later the same day he would sign onto ESPN.com to see 63-year-old Greg Norman’s bare behind on their main page, promoting a magazine issue completely dedicated to showing off the naked bodies of notable athletes.

Listen to the full audio below.

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